On June 24, 2021, US Customs and Border Protection (CBP) issued a Withhold Release Order (WRO) pursuant to 19 USC 1307 against Xinjiang, China-based Hoshine Silicon Industry Co. Ltd. and its subsidiaries (Hoshine). The WRO instructs CPB personnel to detain shipments of silica-based products produced by Hoshine and its subsidiaries, including “materials and goods (such as polysilicon) derived from or produced using those silica-based products.”

On the same day, the US Commerce Department’s Bureau of Industry and Security (BIS) added Hoshine Silicon Industry (Shanshan) Co., Ltd  and four other Xinjiang-based companies to the Entity List based on allegations of their participation “in the practice of, accepting, or utilizing forced labor” in their production processes.

On June 23, 2021, the Department of Labor (DOL) published a Federal Register notice updating its List of Goods Produced by Child Labor or Forced Labor  (TVPRA List) to include polysilicon from China.

Meanwhile, the US Senate Foreign Relations Committee (SFRC) advanced a bill that, if passed, would impose additional restrictions on the importation of goods from China’s Xinjiang Province.


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On January 13, 2021 the US Department of Homeland Security’s Customs and Border Protection (CBP) announced that, effective immediately, all cotton and tomato products imported from China’s Xinjiang Uyghur Autonomous Region (XUAR) will be barred from entering the United States. The ban, officially called a Withhold Release Order (WRO), is “based on information that reasonably indicates the use of detainee or prison labor and situations of forced labor” according to CBP. This region-wide order joins a growing list of WROs targeting alleged forced labor in China.

Under this WRO, all cotton or tomato products originating from XUAR will be detained at all US ports of entry pending the submission to CBP within three months of entry of satisfactory proof that the products were not produced with forced labor. If CBP is unsatisfied with the provided evidence the products will be seized and potential civil and criminal investigations and penalties could occur. This particular WRO also includes apparel, textiles, tomato seeds, canned tomatoes, tomato sauce and other goods made with either cotton or tomatoes from XUAR. CBO has clarified that the WRO “applies to cotton and tomatoes grown in that region and to all products made in whole or in part using this cotton or these tomatoes, regardless of where the downstream products are produced.” Importers of record are responsible for ensuring no part of their product has cotton or tomato inputs that were harvested or produced at any point in their supply chain via forced labor from XUAR.


Continue Reading US Announces Region-Wide Ban on Cotton and Tomato Imports from Xinjiang